Academic Support Programs

Welcome to CLUE

Available to all Seattle campus undergraduates, the Center for Learning and Undergraduate Enrichment (CLUE) is the largest free tutoring program at the UW. We provide tutoring for Math, Chemistry, Physics, Writing, Biology, Statistics, and Computer Science & Engineering.

Summer CLUE operations will be virtual drop-in tutoring only, with limited subject availability. Hours will be 10am- 2pm PT Monday-Thursday.

Please click "Virtual Drop-in Tutoring" below during drop-in tutoring hours to access Summer CLUE.

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If you have any questions, please email clue@uw.edu.

CLUE will be closed Monday 7/04 in observance of the holiday.

CLUE tutoring is more than a resource you can access when you're struggling in a class; it's a welcoming, inclusive space for students to connect, ask questions about various subjects, prepare for exams, and have support on homework. CLUE provides a space for all students to be included, challenged, and supported in their educational journey. We expect that tutors and students alike enter into this space with respect for one another and treat others with kindness.

Community Standards

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In-person Drop-in Tutoring

In-person tutoring will return Fall quarter 2022.

 

As per UW policy, wearing a well-fitted high-quality mask is highly encouraged while in Mary Gates Hall.

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Virtual Drop-in Tutoring

highlight_off Drop-in is currently closed.
See below for hours.

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Discussion Sessions & Exam Reviews

Discussion sessions and exam reviews will return Fall quarter 2022. Click here to see the calendar of CLUE events. To attend these sessions, go to the calendar, click on the event you want to attend, join the event, and a zoom link will be provided to you.

If the event says "This event is currently closed", that simply means we haven't opened the zoom room yet, so check back closer to the start time of the event! We will open events 15-30 minutes prior to the start time.

These include courses outside of our main subject areas. Check to see if your course is listed! More will be added throughout the quarter.

Hours, Updates & Cancellations

Summer quarter we offer support for the following subjects every day we are open: Math, Physics, Writing, CSE and Statistics. Statistics has limited hours and is only open 10am-12pm PST.

CLUE will be closed Monday 7/04 in observance of the holiday.

Frequently Asked Questions

CLUE uses the Zoom platform for video conferencing and Google Docs or GoBoard to collaborate virtually. You must be logged in with your UW NetID and password to access CLUE. We know that the virtual space doesn't always feel supportive and it can be tough to want to engage online. But our peer tutors make tutoring fun with various tools to help you feel supported, all while having their cameras on so you know exactly who you are working with.

  1. When CLUE is open, log into CLUE using the virtual check-in system and you will be placed in a queue. 
  2. In the queue, you will be prompted to let us know what class you would like support with, if you want to see a particular tutor, and if you would like to opt-in for text message notifications. 
  3. Then you will see an estimated wait time to meet with a tutor. You will also be able to see where you are in line. 
  4. When a tutor is ready to meet you, you will get a notification with a Zoom link on that main queue page. Go ahead and access that link within five minutes of receiving it and you will be seen by a tutor.
  5. Please be sure that the name you use in Zoom is the name you enter in the queue check-in. This will help your tutor know they are meeting with the right student.
  6. If you have questions or concerns, use the General Questions queue and you will be directed to our Front Desk Managers who are ready and able to help!
  7. For all other questions, email us at clue@uw.edu.

Drop-in tutoring is offered for all our subjects (Chemistry, Math, Physics, and Writing) Sunday through Thursday from 7 p.m.–11 p.m. Drop-in tutoring is first-come, first-serve. You may wait five minutes or more depending on the availability of our tutors and how many students are waiting for help.

Appointment tutoring ensures that you meet with a tutor at a time you signed up for. There is no waiting time and you are guaranteed thirty minutes of one-on-one tutoring. We are currently only offering appointments for Physics and Writing from 12 p.m.–3 p.m. 

Both options provide one-on-one tutoring for personalized support.

A personal computer or tablet with internet access and sound is necessary to access CLUE.

  • If you do not have access to a laptop/tablet, please go to UW's Student Technology Loan Program website to request technology. Supplies are limited. 
  • Make sure you have the most current version of Zoom downloaded on your device. Once you log into your Zoom account, please go to zoom.us/download to download the latest version. If you have any issues with Zoom, you can get support from UWIT.

If you have any questions about accessing CLUE, please email us at clue@uw.edu.

If you would like help with an academic subject but need more time than is available via drop-in tutoring, consider getting a private tutor. We can send out an inquiry and see if anyone is available and then connect you with that tutor.
Learn more

Subjects

Biology

Sun. Thurs.

Chemistry

Sun. Tues. Wed. Thurs.

Computer Science

Mon. Wed.

Economics

Math

Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs.

Physics

Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs.

Statistics

Tues. Thurs.

Writing Center

Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs.

Meet Our Tutors

Yina, she/her

Yina, she/her

Masters, Juris Doctorate Candidate

I'm excited about

My undergraduate degree is in Religion, so I'm excited to tutor in any subject related to that! My specific focuses were on the intersection of Christianity with race and gender; the relations between religion, violence, art, and war; and how race affects scholarly models in the study of Buddhism in America.

I've taken

I got my undergraduate degree from Pacific Lutheran University, so I haven't taken any UW-specific classes I am well-oriented with most Humanities courses.

Ask me about

I love art and reading! During my sliver of free time I like doing art projects and drawing. I may not be good at either, but I think it's important to have a hobby that can help you relax!

Notable academic failure

My first quarter of Legal Analysis, Research, and Writing did not go so well and the grade I received on my final paper was much lower than I was hoping it would be. What I had to remind myself is that some professional/academic fields require a very different writing style than what you're used to and sometimes that can have an effect on your grade. It thus important to talk to someone that is familiar with the style you're writing in before submitting your work because some professors can be strict when it comes to style!

Tania, she/her

Tania, she/her

Senior, International Studies and Asian Languages and Cultures

I'm excited about

I am excited to work with others to mutually improve our writing techniques and guide those seeking improvement on papers and assignments. Writing plays an integral role in all subjects and it being so diverse interests me as it serves multiple purposes. I am looking forward to reading an array of papers and providing tips that can be used for future successes.

I've taken

I have taken multiple JSIS, and honors courses focused on writing multiple papers.

Ask me about

As a JSIS major, I have a great interest in traveling and learning new languages but outside of school I have an interest in painting and collecting albums. I enjoy taking walks while listening to music and reading romance novels. I, like many others, enjoy binge-watching shows, specifically reality tv shows, and I enjoy classic horror films!

Notable academic failure

My first economics class was difficult for me as an incoming freshman. My first exam was terrible and by midterms, I was close to failing the course. I quickly realized I was unable to learn the material on my own, as I had previously done. I was exposed to new concepts constantly and falling behind was inevitable as concepts built on each other. These failures showed me seeking help was the only way to improve not only my grade but my knowledge. In the second half of the course, I was attending all the CLUE sessions and going to every office hour available. The first half was academically a failure but I learned how to be successful in the future and took away a valuable lesson.

Natalie - Lead tutor, she/hers

Natalie - Lead tutor, she/hers

Senior, Disability Studies and Biochemistry

I'm excited about

Organic Compound Synthesis, Chemical Bonding, Stoichiometry

I've taken

CHEM 142-162, CHEM 237-239, CHEM 241-242, BIO 180-220, GENOME 361 I can also help with: Biology

Ask me about

Tennis, Arts & Crafts, Reading, Volunteering, Golfing, Playing with my Pets

Notable academic failure

During Spring of 2020 (the first online quarter), I failed the first exam of Biology 220. I had spent hours preparing for this exam and taking this exam, so when I got my final results it was really hard to understand. This class was really important for me to get into my major, so I was really disappointed. For the rest of the quarter, I spent more time studying, changed how I was studying to adapt to online, and talked with my peers and others. I ended up improving my grade by a full GPA point from the first grade projection in the class. This taught me how to adapt to different professors' classes and work even harder to achieve my academic goals.

Stephanie, she/her

Stephanie, she/her

Junior, Mechanical engineering

I'm excited about

I like linear algebra, differential equations, and simply anything calculus. Broadly I also enjoy general derivation and trigonometry because I love the puzzle of it!

I've taken

I have taken Math 124, 125, 126, 307, 308, AMATH 301, and I'm currently taking Math 224. I can also help with some early engineering classes, like AA 210, ME 230, ME 123, etc.!

Ask me about

I love learning about astronomy and aerospace technologies. Outside of school I also enjoy hiking, camping, and exploring the city.

Notable academic failure

At the beginning of quarantine, I didn't focus enough on my math class at the time and failed the first midterm. I had to reevaluate my schedule and priorities and was able to eventually pass the next midterm and get a good grade in the class overall. This taught me to better budget my time and how to deal with difficult classes.

Luke, he/him

Luke, he/him

Junior, Comprehensive Physics and Astronomy

I'm excited about

quantum mechanics, astrophysics, and cosmology

I've taken

Intro Physics series 12x, Physics 224, Physics 225, Physics 227, Physics 228, Physics 321, Astronomy 300, Astronomy 322, Astronomy 323, Intro Math series 12x, Math 307, Math 308

Ask me about

I love camping in dense forests and hiking along streams, besides astronomy, math, and physics I'm fascinated by evolutionary psychology and nearly all topics of history.

Notable academic failure

One academic failure that I've faced at UW was my Math 124 grade, I got 2.5 and was devastated because it's a subject I love, I worked harder and learned from my mistakes which allowed me to improve my grade each Math class I took from there on.

Matthew, He/him

Matthew, He/him

Sophomore, Electrical Engineering

I've taken

MATH 125, 126, 207, 208 at UW, and I've covered MATH 124 content before UW. I can also help with: PHYS 12x series, and I'm currently taking MATH 224!

Ask me about

I love swimming (I used to swim a lot in high school, not so much now) and over the past year or two I've gotten into cooking and food in general. I also enjoy playing games, listening to music, and keeping up with new tech.

Notable academic failure

Like a lot of people, I think PHYS 121 was my first "shocker" class as I was adapting to college vs high school classes. I was a successful student in high school and I was used to putting in relatively less effort. When the first midterm for 121 came around, I was overconfident and thought I had learned it all before coming to UW. However, I did not do anywhere near as well as I expected, and it gave me an opportunity to reflect and change my habits. In the end, it was a good time for me to "fail" as I made it through the rest of the physics intro series with good studying and success.

Nick, he/him

Nick, he/him

Senior, Math

I'm excited about

I am really interested in Combinatorics, Algebra, and Number Theory.

I've taken

Math: 126, 300, 301, 308, 324, 327, 394, 402, 403, 404, 424, 425, 461, 462 CSE: 142, 143

Ask me about

I enjoy listening to new music, hang out with friends, watch anime, play games, and eating good food.

Notable academic failure

I think as an out of state student the beginning of my freshman year was tough, as I had to find this balance of academics and trying to find a social group. My first quarter was hard due to not understanding the difficulty of college, as well as not having a social circle it was hard for me to find motivation to study and do well in the class. I think that I was able to become motivated from this struggle and do great in following quarter.

Gianluca, he/him

Gianluca, he/him

Graduated, Mathematics, minor in AMATH

I'm excited about

Manifolds, they are beyond POGGERS. Probably some of the coolest things in math, and I will not stop talking about them if asked.

I've taken

Math: 134/5/6, 334/5/6, 394, 402/3/4, 424/5/6, 441/2/3, 480 (Fourier Analysis), 544/5. I can also help with: AMATH

Ask me about

Hike, play video games, wipe endlessly on mythic bosses, watch anime, eat out, and hang out with friends. Pop off and talk about math.

Notable academic failure

During Math 335, I started to not take the class as serious as I had been, and started being really lazy when it came to studying for that class. In the end, during the second midterm it really showed, to myself especially, that I truly had no understanding of what I was learning. I don't mean the you're-reading-the-textbook-and-you-have-no-clue-what-it-means-and-you-somehow-understand-it-later thing. I mean, I legit had no clue what was that material. That catastrophe stuck with me, and I ended up pulling my act together, not in time for the end of 335, but definitely for Math 336, and I performed better and I understood more.

You can watch this video to get a sense of what CLUE is like in person.

Contact Us

Do you have questions? Are you looking for accommodations or a quiet space to use CLUE? Email us at clue@uw.edu

Feedback

We want to hear about your experience. Send us your information via the CLUE Feedback Form